School-Aged Children

School-Aged Children
Professional Development for all your staff
- starting at $10 per month

"All I really need to know... I learned in kindergarten." - Robert Fulghum

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More than Half a Childhood: The Role of School-age Programs

Author: Jan Blaxall

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

Children today live in a different world than in previous generations. This module is meant for providers and staff of school-age child care programs. It looks at research identifying the needs and children 6-12 and the practices that will best meet these needs.

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Active Play and the School-Aged Child

Author: Jan Blaxall

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

The Active Healthy Kids Canada (AHKC) report card has been reporting annually on the state of physical activity of Canadian children. The story is not a good news story. It should be of concern to all because physical activity is crucial for individual and societal health.

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Meeting The Needs Of Newcomer Children In Classrooms

Author: Judith Colbert, PHD

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

In earlier modules in the Newcomer Series, settlement is described as a process of transition and the distinctive needs of all those involved in settlement are considered, with a special focus on the needs of the newcomer child. In this module  you will have an opportunity to think specifically about the challenges of meeting the needs of newcomer children in group settings such as classrooms and to consider the overall role of the early childhood program or school in the settlement of young immigrants and refugees.

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Delinquency or Resiliency? How "Problem" Behavior Can Be A Child's Hidden Path to Resilience

Author: Michael Ungar, Ph.D

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Leadership

“We see it in our classrooms and on the evening news: an endless stream of children and teenagers who act with seemingly senseless disregard for themselves and others. But there is another side to this. Dr. Michael Ungar’s work with troubled youth has shown him that the behaviours that worry us most as parents, caregivers, police, counsellors and educators, are those that are sometimes a young person’s best strategy for survival. In this report, Dr. Ungar untangles “problem” behaviours and provides new ways for us to recognize, understand and strengthen hidden resilience”.